From Cuzco to Carnegie Hall -Gail

I’ve travelled as far south as I’ll probably ever venture (65°06’S / 063°59’W) unless I join a South Pole expedition team (for which I am totally unsuitable).  I’ve treated patients who live in the equivalent of chicken coops. And I’ve seen my kids grow and mature in front of my eyes. Julia, 9, continues to…

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Ushuaia to Boca Raton -Gail

Ushuaia to Boca Raton – not the most common flight path, and not the easiest way to re-enter our “old” lives.  Just after our passage through the infamous Drake Passage and into the calm waters of the Beagle Passage, the news of Blizzard Jonas began to trickle in. It’s been a while since we cared…

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Antarctica -Lena

We were told that Antarctica would amaze, inspire, and overwhelm us. And yes, it did.  The two day crossing of the notorious Drake Passage had me (and my stomach) ready to turn back to the sheltered waters of Argentina. But then we saw our first iceberg. Next, Humpback whales were spotted diving on the port…

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A Trip of a Lifetime -Karen O’Keefe

We just spent 12 days traveling around Chilean and Argentinian Patagonia with the Goldsteins. Prior to the trip,  I don’t think any of us knew quite what to expect despite having looked at pictures and reading guide books. Different words my girls used to describe the trip on the way home were “windy, wild, cold,…

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South America in Numbers -Gail

-4 tour guides named Darwin –  18 flights taken –  16 boats taken –  3 high Andes crossing –  450 patients seen –  1 backpack lost –  1 backpack found –  3 species of penguin seen –  1 sloth hugged –  6 countries visited –  10 telescopes gazed through –  12 zip lines zipped down…

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Valparaiso, Chile -Lena

Closely resembling San Francisco, Valparaiso, a city on the coast of Chile, is rich in history (and full of backpackers). Once Chile’s most popular port city, Valparaiso’s wealth grew with the California gold rush, and the city expanded around the surrounding hills. Each hill (cerro) is lined by steep and narrow streets, though funiculars (ascensors)…

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What’s for dinner? -Andrew

So I love a great thick grass fed steak with a glass of Argentinean Malbec or Chilean Cabernet more than almost anyone I know. I also salivate over Peruvian chicken or lamb grilled al carbon (grilled over charcoal). During our travels I have even been tempted by and have enjoyed alapaca, llama, caiman alligator, and…

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Reading Allende in Santiago -Gail

One of my goals for this gap year was to read the right books at the right moments. Whenever I travel, I promise myself I’ll read the classic tome of my destination, but rarely do I really get farther than buying and lugging it along. This time is different. I’ve read Darwin in the Galapagos,…

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Crossing the Andes -Gail

Argentina and Chile lie, spooning each other, with the great Andes mountains between them. We’ve crossed these mountains twice by bus – in 8 hour stretches, climbing as high as 4800 meters before descending. We can easily tell the vicuña from the llamas, and we are learning to enjoy blaring dubbed movies on the bus….

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Our Non-traditional, Traditional Thanksgiving -Lena

After Halloween in the jungle, I’ll admit I was a skeptic about Thanksgiving on a ranch. The whole extended family flew all the way to Buenos Aires and we weren’t even going to try to get them some turkey? Instead we spent our non-traditional holiday on a typical Argentinian Estancia, horseback riding, watching traditional gaucho…

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